The New York Flora Association welcomes you

All interested persons are invited to join the New York Flora Association, a membership-based organization dedicated to the promotion of field botany and greater understanding of the plants that grow in the wild in New York State. Ours is a non-profit group funded largely by member dues and gifts, but we may also accept grant funds.


To view or download a SUMMARY of the NYFA Workshops and Field Trips for 2017, click here.

 

To view or download the COMPLETE DETAILS (as shown below)  of the NYFA Workshops and Field Trips for 2017, click here.

 

Upcoming Field Trips and Workshops

  

20 January 2018 (Saturday). WORKSHOP: Identification of Plants in Winter. (Onondaga County).   Instructor: Joe McMullen

 

January 20, 2018 (Saturday). Workshop: Identification of Plants in Winter. (Syracuse Area).   Instructor: Joe McMullen.

What: This workshop will cover the interesting and challenging topic of the identification of plants during leaf off conditions.  It is for beginners and experts alike.  Although many fail to botanize during the winter months, it is amazing what plants can be identified during this off season.  It is actually a good time to see patterns of plant community structure, which can be obscured during leaf-on conditions. 

When deciduous woody trees and shrubs shed their leaves and other parts, distinguishing scars are left behind.  These scars, along with persistent fruit from the past season, next season’s leaf and flower buds, pith characteristics, and growth form features are used to identify plant species in winter and will be covered during the workshop.   

And, it is not just woody species that can be readily recognized in winter.  Several of our ferns are winter green, while others leave behind easily identified persistent spore stalks.  Our clubmosses are also evident in winter, as they are not hidden among other ground cover.  Dried stalks, basal rosettes, and persistent parts from herbaceous flowering plants are also often easily identified.

Who: Joe McMullen, retired consultant and botanist, NYFA Board Member.

When and Where: Saturday January 20, 2018. The workshop classroom portion will be held at the Onondaga Lake Visitors Center near the NYS Fairgrounds just west of Syracuse.  The field portion will be held at nearby state land.  This is a one day workshop, with the classroom portion from 10:00 to 12:00 and the field portion from 1:00 to 3:30.  Lunch is on your own. 

Cost: Workshop fee is $40 for NYFA members and students, and $60 for nonmembers. 

Registration and Inquiries:  To register send an email with contact information (name, address, affiliation, email and best phone) to Joe McMullen (joymcmullen2@msn.com) and register via Paypal link below.  Alternatively, you may mail a check for the full amount made out to the New York Flora Association, PO Box 122, Albany NY 12201.  For questions you can contact Joe McMullen at joymcmullen2@msn.com

 

Future 2018 Workshops and Field Trips should be online in February 2018.

 

Take a look at last year's events to whet your appetite for what is to come!

 

2017 Workshops and Field Trips

 

20 January 2018 (Saturday). WORKSHOP: Identification of Plants in Winter. (Onondaga County).   Instructor: Joe McMullen

21 May.  (Sunday)  10:00 am.  FIELD TRIP: Warner Hill (Washington County).  Leader: Rich Ring.

4 June (Sunday).  9:30 am to 4 pm. FIELD TRIP:  Thatcher’s Pinnacles and Vicinity. (Tompkins County).  Leader: David Werier.  Joint with Finger Lakes Native Plant Society. 

9 - 11 June (Friday - Sunday).WORKSHOP: Grasses of New York (Tompkins County). Instructor: David Werier.  Co-sponsored by the Bailey Hortorium, Cornell University.   Workshop is full - waitlist only.

14 June (Wednesday).  10 am to 5 pm. FIELD TRIP:  Plants of Lucky Star Alvar (Jefferson County).Leaders: Don Leopold and Mike Hough.  This Field Trip is full - waitlist only.

24-25 June (Saturday - Sunday).  FIELD TRIP:  In the Footsteps of Hotchkiss - Tug Hill Botany Weekend (Lewis County).  Leaders: Anne Johnson and Steven Daniel

28 - 30  June (Wednesday - Friday).   WORKSHOP: Sedges (County).  Instructor:  Tony Reznicek.  Co-sponsored by SUNY ESF.  Workshop is full - waitlist only.

1 July (Saturday). 10:00 am.  FIELD TRIP: Fredonia College Lodge Nature Preserve (Chatauqua County).  Leaders: Jon and Priscilla Titus.  Joint with Niagara Frontier Botanical Society.

15 July (Saturday). 10:00 am.  FIELD TRIP: Dry Brook Ridge:  A Bog, A Swale and a Cliff Face Walk (Delaware County).  Leader: Dr. Mike Kudish.

3 August (Thursday).  10:00 am. FIELD TRIP: Valcour Island. (Clinton County).  Leader: Steve Young. Joint with Adirondack Botanical Society. This Field Trip is full - waitlist only.

5 August (Saturday). 10 am to 1 pm.  FIELD TRIP:  Whiteface Mountain (Essex County).  Leader: Steve Young.  Joint with Adirondack Botanical Society.

6 August (Sunday). 10:30 am to 2:30 pm.  WORKSHOP: LEARN 10…Heath Family (Ericaceae) (Ulster County).  Instructor: Molly Marquand.  Joint with Catskill Native Plant Society.

19 August (Saturday). 1 pm to 5 pm.   WORKSHOP: LEARN 10…Shrubs  (Franklin County).  Instructor: Dan Spada.   Joint with Wild Center.

26 August (Saturday). 9 am to 4 pm.  FIELD TRIP: Exploring Chenango Valley State Park.  Leader: Julian Shepherd.  Joint with Leatherstocking Botanical Society.

9 September (Saturday), 9 am to 3pm. Beach botany at Jones Beach (Nassau County). Leaders: Steve Young and Mike Feder. Joint with the Long Island Botanical Society.

15 September (Friday), 5 pm to 7 pm. Learn 10 . . . Asters and Goldenrods (Schenectady County). Leader: Steve Young. Joint with the Capital District Friday Field Group 

16 September (Saturday). 10 am.  FIELD TRIP: Botany along the St. Lawrence. (St. Lawrence County).  Leaders: Anne Johnson and Steven Daniel

24th September (Sunday), 10 am to 3 pm. FIELD TRIP: Petal Pedal from East Syracuse to Green Lakes State Park  along the Erie Canal Bike Path (Onondaga County). Leaders: Steve Young and Joe McMullen. 

 

21 January (Saturday). WORKSHOP: Identification of Plants in Winter. (Onondaga County).   Instructor: Joe McMullen.  (Note: If you missed this workshop, look for it to be repeated in January 2018.)

What: This workshop will cover the interesting and challenging topic of the identification of plants during leaf off conditions.  It is for beginners and experts alike.  Although many fail to botanize during the winter months, it is amazing what plants can be identified during this off season.  It is actually a good time to see patterns of plant community structure, which can be obscured during leaf-on conditions. 

When deciduous woody trees and shrubs shed their leaves and other parts, distinguishing scars are left behind.  These scars, along with persistent fruit from the past season, next season’s leaf and flower buds, pith characteristics, and growth form features are used to identify plant species in winter and will be covered during the workshop.   

And, it is not just woody species that can be readily recognized in winter.  Several of our ferns are winter green, while others leave behind easily identified persistent spore stalks.  Our clubmosses are also evident in winter, as they are not hidden among other ground cover.  Dried stalks, basal rosettes, and persistent parts from herbaceous flowering plants are also often easily identified.

Who: Joe McMullen, retired consultant and botanist, NYFA Board Member.

When and Where: Saturday January 21, 2017. The workshop classroom portion will be held at the Onondaga Lake Visitors Center near the NYS Fairgrounds just west of Syracuse.  The field portion will be held at nearby state land.  This is a one day workshop, with the classroom portion from 10:00 to 12:00 and the field portion from 1:00 to 3:00.  Lunch is on your own. 

Cost: Workshop fee is $30 for NYFA members and students, and $50 for nonmembers. 

Registration and Inquiries:  To register send an email to Steven Daniel (natdisc@gmail.com) and include 1) your contact information (name, address, affiliation, email and best phone) and 2) an emergency contact person and phone number.  Then pay the registration fee via the Paypal link below or mail a check for the full amount made out to the New York Flora Association, PO Box 122, Albany NY 12201.  For questions about the workshop please contact Joe McMullen at joymcmullen2@msn.com.

 

21 May (Sunday), 10 am to 3pm  FIELD TRIP: Warner Hill (Washington County).  Leader: Rich Ring

     We will explore the slopes and summit of this limestone ridge, which features calciphiles such as Chinquapin Oak (Quercus muhlenbergia) and Bladdernut (Staphylea trifoliata).  We will look especially for spring ephemerals and early sedges, (including Carex backii and Carex formosa, previously known from the site or nearby) in the dry limestone woodland and  forest. This is a short hike but we'll spend most of our time off trail on sometimes rocky and unsteady footing.  Meeting place and possible carpool from Whitehall, NY TBA. 

     For trip details and to sign up, contact Rich Ring at richardmring@gmail.com, or 206 941 6777 

4 June (Sunday).  9:30 am to 4 pm.  FIELD TRIP:   Thatcher's Pinnacles and vicinity, (Tompkins County). Leader:  David Werier.  Joint with Finger Lakes Native Plant Society.

     We will explore the interesting and botanical rich Thatcher's Pinnacles which occurs on the rim of the Cayuga Inlet Valley. This is primarily a dry upland site. If time allows we may venture down into the valley. The going should be relatively easy although we may go off trail and we will be climbing in elevation. A local botanical hot spot we should see many interesting species. Some species of interest that we may encounter include Amelanchier sanguinea (round-leaved shadbush), Calamagrostis perplexa (Clausen's reed grass), Carex siccata (dry-spiked sedge), C. willdenowii (Willdenow's sedge), Ceanothus americanus (New Jersey-tea), Elymus trachycaulus (wheat grass), Lilium philadelphicum (wood lily), and more. For those interested in carpooling from Ithaca, a carpool will leave Ithaca at 9 AM. Otherwise, we will meet near West Danby, NY at 9:30 AM. We will have lunch in the field.

     Pre-registration is required. To register and for questions contact David Werier (Nakita[at]lightlink.com). 

 

9 - 11 June (Friday - Sunday). WORKSHOP: Grasses of New York (Tompkins County). Instructor: David Werier.  Joint with Bailey Hortorium at Cornell University.

WORKSHOP FULL - waitlist only

What: Grasses are a large and significant part of the flora of New York, making up around 9% of the flora. They include highly invasive species as well as very rare natives. They grow in deep marshes, on dry rocky summits, and in cracks in sidewalks. Almost all habitats in New York contain at least a few species and often times many more. Yet because they often look superficially similar to each other and their flowers are small and relatively nondescript many people do not make the effort to identify them. Still, many grasses are relatively easy to identify and being able to identify them can enhance ones appreciation of what grows around them.

This workshop will focus on the identification and ecology of grasses that occur in New York. We will spend a lot of time in the field and have lab time as well, where access to dissecting microscopes will make examination of the small floral structures easier. This workshop is for all levels. There will be a review of basic grass parts and time for self or group study of specimens that will be supplied and/or that students bring.

Who: David Werier is a student of the flora of New York. His passion centers on understanding and becoming familiar with all the species that occur in the state and enjoys sharing that knowledge with those that are interested. He has taught numerous workshops on different taxonomic groups including grasses. His intention for the workshop is that participants will walk away with the knowledge and skills to readily identify the grasses they encounter in New York (and beyond).

When and Where: This workshop will take place from Friday June 9th at 7 pm to Sunday the 11th in the afternoon. It will be based out of the Bailey Hortorium Herbarium at Cornell University, Ithaca, New York (Tompkins Co.) and we will travel to various sites in the Ithaca area for field work.

Cost: The cost for the workshop includes the entire weekend instructional program and use of the lab.  Meals and housing are not included. The workshop fee is $140 for NYFA members and students; $170 for non-members. Participants are encouraged to become NYFA members (see the NYFA website www.nyflora.org).

Registration: Participation is limited so please sign up early. To register send an email with contact info and an emergency contact person and their phone number information to David Werier, Nakita[at]lightlink.com.  Then pay the registration fee via the Paypal link below, or mail a check made out to the New York Flora Association / PO Box 122 / Albany, NY 12201-0122.

Inquiries: For questions you can contact David Werier (607) 273-1765 or Nakita[at]lightlink.com

 

14 June (Wednesday), 10am to 5 pm. FIELD TRIP: Plants of Lucky Star Alvar (Jefferson County). Leaders: Don Leopold and Mike Hough.   

This Field Trip is  full - waitlist only

     The alvar ecosystem of Jefferson County is an incredible assemblage of common, unusual, and rare prairie plants that occurs over limestone bedrock outcrops where flooding snow melt and summer drought produce a harsh environment. This is a unique opportunity to see this private preserve and explore it habitats and diverse flora with botanists Don Leopold from SUNY ESF and Mike Hough from SUNY Cortland who have spent years cataloging the plants of the site.  The trip is limited to 20 participants.  

     If you plan to attend and for trip details, contact Steve Young at 518-588-8360 or nyflora1 (at) gmail.com.

 

24 - 25 June (Saturday-Sunday).  FIELD TRIP: In the Footsteps of Hotchkiss - A Tug Hill Botany Extravaganza. (Lewis County).  Leaders: Anne Johnson and Steven Daniel.

     Tug Hill is arguably the least known part of New York, and its botany is no exception.  Yet back in  the late 1920’s, Neil Hotchkiss, Assistant State Botanist, did a preliminary botanical survey published in 1932 (NYS Museum Publication #287 - A Botanical Survey of the Tug Hill Plateau) that hints at some of the riches of this region.   This weekend we will explore some of the areas that Hotchkiss made known, as we discover some of its little known delights.

     Join us for a visit to the famed Parker’s Fen on the Tug Hill. After exploring this calcareous fen and nearby cedar swamp we will spend the rest of Saturday exploring to trace some of the other nearby areas around Parkers.   On Sunday we plan to visit a Gulf to discover more of this regions botanical wonders.

     Highlights may include a variety of native orchids including from the large showy lady’s slipper (Cypripedium reginae) to the tiny twayblades (Neottia),  Jacob’s ladder (Polemonium vanbruntiae), and spotted phlox (Phlox maculata).

     There are motels in Lowville, camping in Whetstone Gulf State Park, as well as many acres of state land.

     Preregistration is required, with preference given to NYFA members.  Space is limited so please register early by sending a note to Anne Johnson (ritzko@northnet.org) and/or Steven Daniel (natdisc@gmail.com)  with your contact info and the name/phone/email of an emergency contact person.  Further details forthcoming after registration and closer to the weekend.

 

28 - 30 June (optional Wednesday evening - Friday).  WORKSHOP: Sedges. (Onondaga County). Instructor:  Tony Reznicek.  Co-sponsored with State University of New York, College of Environmental Science and Forestry.  

WORKSHOP FULL - waitlist only

What: The workshop will focus on sedges, but rushes and grasses will be discussed. Multiple field sites will be explored in the Central NY area.  This workshop will be valuable for a wide range of experience and will benefit botanists, ecologists, wetland delineators, restoration ecologists, and more. The workshop will include both lab and field exercises. All participants are encouraged to bring plant material from their areas of interest for evening ID and discussions with Tony.

Who: Dr. Tony Reznicek (University of Michigan), the renowned Carex expert and author to various FNA Cyperaceae treatments, will lead the workshop.

When and Where: The workshop classroom portion will be held at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry at Syracuse and we will travel to various sites for fieldwork. The workshop officially will begin on Thursday morning. There will be 2 full days plus Thursday evening with Tony to work with keys. On Wednesday eve (June 28) there will be lab time for set up and to start working on your specimens. Tony will be available on the 28th to answer questions and help with specimens.  The Wednesday eve portion is optional. 

Cost: Workshop fee is $175 for NYFA members and students; $205 for non-members. Cost does not include lodging or meals. Further information, including meal and lodging options will be sent later to registrants closer to the time. Participants are encouraged to become NYFA members (see the NYFA website http://www.nyflora.org/)

Registration and Inquiries: Participation is limited so please sign up early. To register send an email with contact information (name, address, affiliation, email and best phone) to Ed Frantz (ed.frantz@dot.ny.gov) and register via the Paypal link below.  Alternately you may mail a check for the full amount with the name of the workshop in the memo line made out to the New York Flora Association / PO Box 122 / Albany, NY 12201-0122.  For questions you can contact Ed Frantz (315)793-2421 or ed.frantz@dot.ny.gov

 

 

 

1 July  (Saturday). 10 am.  FIELD TRIP: Fredonia’s (SUNY Campus) College Lodge Nature Preserve in Brocton NY (Chautauqua County). Leaders: Jon and Priscilla Titus.

     Join us on this joint trip with the Niagara Frontier Botanical Society as we explore the complex and diverse 200-acre Nature Preserve owned and managed by SUNY’s Fredonia Campus. The Preserve is located on a ridge that separates the Mississippi and Saint Lawrence watersheds and offers a variety of plant community types including old growth hemlock forest, mature mixed hardwood forest, and an extensive emergent marsh.  In recent years, more than 400 species have been documented within the Preserve.  Rare species include Emory’s Sedge (Carex emoryi), lesser bladderwort (Utricularia minor), and Hill’s pondweed (Potamogeton hillii). Other species of special interest include three Platanthera species. This trip is designed to appeal to seasoned botanists as well as those just learning about our native plant communities.  We will visit several habitats and search out plants that appeal to the participants. We will also visit the portions of the Preserve that have been colonized by non-native species to discuss control efforts, and will visit recently installed deer exclusion study sites.

     Participants will meet at the Preserve’s main parking lot at 10am.  Be prepared for off–trail travel and bring knee boots or a kayak if you would like to explore the marsh in greater detail.  Contact Jon Titus at titus@fredonia.edu or 716-785-1526 to register or questions. 

 

15 July (Saturday). 9:45 am. FIELD TRIP: Catskill Forest History: A First Growth Forest and Fen Walk  (Delaware County). Leader: Dr. Mike Kudish.

     The forest and vegetational communities we see on the landscape today reflect natural and cultural events and activities on the land that took place over the last several thousand years.  Since the glaciers wiped the slate clean, plants have migrated into and out of our landscape.  Even though no one actually recorded the changes that have taken place over the last 10,000 years, there is evidence that we can read that can give us insight into the forest expression we see today and the vegetational communities that came before.  

     Dr. Kudish will lead the group through a spectacular first growth forest and to a small fen whose peat has been carbon-dated to ∼12,000 ybp and is one of the few places in the Catskills where white ash (Fraxinus americana) and black ash (F. nigra) grow together.  The walk involves some bushwhacking.  Participants should be prepared with sturdy boots, bug dope/tick repellent, lunch, snacks, and ample water as we may be out until late afternoon.   

     Dr. Michael Kudish is a retired Professor from Paul Smith’s College.  He has hiked and studied the Catskill’s forest for over 50 years.  He is the author or numerous books and articles focusing on the Catskills and the Adirondacks including, “The Catskill Forest: A History” and “Adirondack Upland Flora”.  Dr. Kudish resides in Arkville where he actively conducts forest and wetland research in the Catskill Mountains, writes and lectures.

     We will meet at the Dry Brook Ridge - Balsam Lake Mtn. trailhead, near Arkville,  at 9:45 am sharp and carpool to our destination.  Directions to the parking area will be forwarded upon registration.  

     Participation is limited so please sign up early. To register send an email with contact information (name, address, affiliation, email and best phone) to Dan Spada  (spadas2013 AT gmail.com).

 

3 August (Thursday). 9am to 5pm. FIELD TRIP. Summer Flora of Valcour Island in Lake Champlain, Plattsburgh (Clinton County). Leaders: Steve Young and Ray Curran. Joint with the Adirondack Botanical Society.

This Field Trip is  full - waitlist only

     We will spend the day cataloging the plants of Valcour Island, one of the most scenic and diverse sites in New York, where we hope to see some of the twenty-three rare plants listed for the island. We will travel to the island by boat and spend the day hiking and botanizing.  Most of the island is flat but there will be some hills to traverse on well-worn trails. This will be a joint trip with the Adirondack Botanical Society.  If you plan to attend and for trip details, contact Steve Young at 518-588-8360 or nyflora1 (at) gmail.com. Spaces limited to 20 so sign up early.

 

5 August (Saturday), 10 am to 1 pm. FIELD TRIP:  Whiteface Mountain (Essex County).  Leader: Steve Young. Joint with Adirondack Botanical Society.

             We will take a walk from the parking lot of Whiteface Mountain, up the stairs to the top and then down the Wilmington Trail to the parking lot.  We will look at the wide diversity of alpine and krumholz plants and see if we can add to the extensive checklist of plants for the summit and the roadside. This is a moderate hike and will involve a climb up the long stairway from the castle to the top and a walk down a rocky, sometimes bouldery trail to the road. The trip will start at the entrance to the castle at the top of the parking lot. For trip details and to sign up, contact Steve Young at nyflora1 (at) gmail.com.   

 

6 August (Sunday). 10:30 am to 2:30 pm. WORKSHOP: LEARN 10…ERICACEAE (Ulster County).  Instructor: Molly Marquand.  Joint with Catskill Native Plant Society.

     What do wintergreen, blueberry, mountain laurel, and male berry have in common? Answer: they are members of the same family, the Ericaceae. Join the Catskill Native Plant Society and the New York Flora Association on a joint field trip to Minnewaska State Park to learn what makes the Ericaceae so ericaceous. Learning family characteristics is one of the best ways to bolster a broad base of botanical knowledge and start making accurate IDs in the field. Wear sturdy, comfortable boots for the long walk to Lake Awosting and bring a bagged lunch. As an added bonus, the vast swaths of sweet spire (Clethra alnifolia) should be blooming along the lake and will make for a wonderful, aromatic walk! Meet at the Jenny Lane parking lot at 10:00a.m. Contact mollymarquand AT gmail.com for more details. 

“Learn 10…” is a program of the NY Flora Association (NYFA) designed to help people of all ages and levels of knowledge begin learning the plants of New York.  “Learn 10…” focuses on a group of only ten plants to teach simple techniques for easily identifying any plant, including trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns and mosses. “Learn 10…” is a fun and interactive way to learn plants and develop a deeper appreciation of the natural world.

 

 

19 August (Saturday). 1 pm to 5 pm.   WORKSHOP: LEARN 10…Shrubs  (Franklin County).  Instructor: Dan Spada.   Joint with Wild Center. 

     Local botanist Dan Spada will guide participants in a beginner’s course on how to identify 10 native shrub species through the use of keys, guides and their senses during a combination of lab and field sessions. Instruction will be provided on the use of keys and guides as well as field signs to be able to identify shrubs.  The route is over moderate terrain, but participants should be prepared with sturdy shoes, sunscreen, hat, water, and bug dope.  A 10x hand lens is optional.  Participants may bring guidebooks, although guides will be provided.  Anyone interested in how to know the trees is encouraged to participate; no prior botanical training is necessary. 

     This trip is limited to 15 participants.  Please register here.  Registrants should meet at the Administration Desk of the Wild Center by 12:45 p.m.

“Learn 10…” is a program of the NY Flora Association (NYFA) designed to help people of all ages and levels of knowledge begin learning the plants of New York.  “Learn 10…” focuses on a group of only ten plants to teach simple techniques for easily identifying any plant, including trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns and mosses. “Learn 10…” is a fun and interactive way to learn plants and develop a deeper appreciation of the natural world.

 

 

26 August (Saturday). 9 am to 4 pm.  FIELD TRIP: Exploring Chenango Valley State Park.  Leader: Julian Shepherd.  Joint with Leatherstocking Botanical Society. 

     Chenango Valley State Park, 1,137 acres located in Chenango Forks NY, is a glacial dump area with plains and numerous kettle holes now occupied by 2 lakes with acidic boggy mats, an alkaline swamp, and several fens, both open and shrubby. The Park has been protected for close to 100 years, with mature oak forests on a sandy, gravelly substrate.  Flora of the boggy areas include Drosera, Sarracenia, Vacciniums, Menyanthes, Chara, and at least 2 species of Utricularia.  The forests have at least 4 species of orchids and various species characteristic of more acidic, sandy soils not common in the Southern Tier.  The western boundary of the Park is the Chenango River whose bottomlands include some unusual species such as Senecio suaveolens and Hypericum ascyron.

     Meet at the "Tween Lakes" Picnic Area inside Chenango Valley State Park.  Bring a lunch, snacks, water and typical field gear, rubber boots or footwear for wet conditions.  

     To register please contact Julian Shepherd, jshepher@binghamton.edu, 607-722-9327 (home), or 607-777-6538 (work).

 

9 September (Saturday), 9am to 3pm. FIELD TRIP: Beach botany at Jones Beach (Nassau County). Leaders: Steve Young and Mike Feder. Joint with the Long Island Botanical Society.

     Long Island’s beaches have a flora unique to the state and what better place to learn it than at the most famous beach in New York. Jones Beach has a diversity of habitats from the open beach with rare plants like seabeach amaranth and seabeach knotweed to dunes, back dunes, and interdunal swales where a wide variety of herbs, shrubs and trees, common and rare, survive at the mercy of the shifting sands. Join leaders Steve Young from the NY Flora Association and Mike Feder from the Long Island Botanical Society for a look at this interesting ecosystem. 

     If you plan to attend and for trip details, contact Steve Young at 518-588-8360 or nyflora1 (at) gmail.com. 

 

15 September (Friday), 5:00 to 7:00 pm. Workshop:  Learn 10 . . . Asters and Goldenrods (Schenectady County). Leader: Steve Young.  Joint with the Capital District Friday Field Group

     Botanist Steve Young will guide participants through the Woodlawn Preserve in Schenectady in a beginner’s course on how to identify 10 aster and goldenrod species. Instruction will be provided on the use of keys and field guides as well as field signs to be able to identify these late summer wildflowers.  The route is over moderate, sandy terrain, but participants should be prepared with sturdy shoes, sunscreen, hat, water, and insect repellent.  A 10x hand lens is optional but recommended.  Participants may bring guidebooks like Newcomb’s Wildflower Guide or Petersons Guide to Wildflowers.  Anyone interested in these wildflowers is encouraged to participate and no prior botanical training is necessary. Meet at 1 Gifford Road at the entrance to the preserve. 

“Learn 10…” is a program of the NY Flora Association (NYFA) designed to help people of all ages and levels of knowledge begin learning the plants of New York.  “Learn 10…” focuses on a group of only ten plants to teach simple techniques for easily identifying any plant, including trees, shrubs, wildflowers, grasses, ferns and mosses. “Learn 10…” is a fun and interactive way to learn plants and develop a deeper appreciation of the natural world.

 

 

16 September (Saturday), 10 am.  FIELD TRIP: Botany along the St. Lawrence (St. Lawrence County). Leaders: Anne Johnson and Steven Daniel. 

     Join us as we explore the shorelines in northern St. Lawrence County at Robert Moses State Park and vicinity. We hope to see a good display of the lesser fringed gentian (Gentianopsis procera) as well as the recently “discovered in NY” Great Lakes lady’s tresses (Spiranthes magnicamporum), Spiranthes casei, white camas (Anticlea elegans) and a variety of goldenrods and asters. We make other stops along the shoreline of the St. Lawrence for the showy Maximillian’s sunflower (Helianthus maximilliani), the tiny Selaginella eclipes, grape ferns (Botrychium spp), as well as marsh horsetail (Equisetum palustre).

     Preregistration is required, with preference given to NYFA members.  Please register by sending a note to Anne Johnson (ritzko@northnet.org) and/or Steven Daniel (natdisc@gmail.com)  with your contact info and the name and phone/email of an emergency contact person.

 

24th September (Sunday). 10am to 3pm. FIELD TRIP: Petal Pedal from East Syracuse to Green Lakes State Park  along the Erie Canal Bike Path (Onondaga County). Leaders: Steve Young and Joe McMullen. 

     Pump up your tires for a 10 mile round trip bike ride from Erie Canal Park in Dewitt along the Erie Canal trail to Green Lakes State Park to look at the early fall flora along the way. At the park we will learn some of the plants there too. We will eat lunch at the park and then head back down the trail to our starting point.  

     If you plan to attend and for trip details, contact Steve at 518-588-8360 or nyflora1 (at) gmail.com. Spaces limited to 15 so sign up early.

 

 

 


To pay for workshops using Paypal, please use the drop-down box below.  Be sure to select the correct workshop, and pay according to whether you are a NYFA member or not (we encourage new members!) Please consider an optional donation to help further NYFA's mission.  Then click the Add to cart button, and add the required information.  You will get an immediate email confirmation from Paypal, and later,  an acknowledgment from NYFA.

 

Cancellation and Refund Policy:

The workshop fee, minus a $20 processing fee, is refundable up to two weeks prior to the start of the workshop. No refunds for cancellations within two weeks of the start of the workshop. Alternatively, the registrant may opt (one time per original cancellation) to apply 50% of the fee to a future NYFA workshop to be offered in the same or following year. 

Plants in Winter - January 28, 2018

 


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